SLA 2015 part 5: Deconstructing Storage

silverfish There hasn’t been much programming related to physical collections at SLA in recent years, so I was very happy to see Deconstructing Storage: Creating Safe Spaces for your Physical Collections on the schedule. While my library continues to move in a more digital direction, I foresee our physical collections retaining their importance for a long time yet, and we are in the midst of renovating new library space.

The four speakers talked about different aspects of physical spaces, from shelving to building enclosures to pests, and even preservation through digitization. They also represented different roles in libraries, including architects, librarians, consultants, and business partners. This provided some welcome perspective on communication; for example, architects and librarians may estimate stack capacity differently.

One speaker recommended Building Blocks for Planning Functional Library Space, published in 2011 by the American Library Association.

The discussion of different fire suppression systems and climate control were especially interesting to me as my library is getting ready to finish a new library construction project. I was able to bring information learned at this session back to my board right after the conference.

Tony Stankus drew the most reactions from the audience as he talked about integrated pest management—in other words, creepy crawlies, from bookworms and silverfish to cockroaches. Whereas most discussions I’ve heard of pests in libraries focus on damage to books and other materials, Tony also included risks to humans like the increase in asthma in environments where cockroaches are prevalent.

I thought it was an interesting twist to include a speaker on digitization as preservation in this session. Taylor Surface from OCLC recommended reading “More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing” by Mark A. Greene and Dennis Meissner (The American Archivist 68: 208–263). The paper advocates a strategy of describing “everything in general before describing anything in detail” (a strategy my library has adopted as a coping mechanism for our processing backlog). Surface also recommended two methods for assessing digital repositories: TRAC or Trustworthy Repositories Audit & Certification: Criteria and Checklist (published by The Center for Research Libraries and OCLC) and DRAMBORA or Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment (a self-assessment toolkit).

I hope SLA programming continues to address the many special libraries which still rely heavily on physical collections and include preservation in their missions.